Craig Green's Transition

Craig Green's Transition

THIS STORY IS AN EXCERPT FROM V98. ORDER YOUR COPY HERE NOW

THIS STORY IS AN EXCERPT FROM V98. ORDER YOUR COPY HERE NOW

Photography: NICOLE MARIA WINKLER

Styling: VICTORIA SEKRIER

Text: Katharine K. Zarrella

Craig Green might be a menswear designer, but can you blame us ladies for wanting in on the action? Since launching his cerebral, utilitarian line in 2012, the 29-year-old has been heralded as one of London’s most innovative new talents. In addition to winning a British Fashion Award, having his work featured alongside that of Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent in the Met’s China: Through the Looking Glass exhibition, and getting Nick Knight to shoot his debut F/W ’15 campaign, the Central Saint Martins grad has collaborated with the likes of Adidas and Topman, was shortlisted for the LVMH Fashion Prize, and is not just stocked but celebrated by major international retailers, including Dover Street Market and Barneys New York. But what’s causing the buzz around Green’s menswear of late are the women who are sporting it. “Since the beginning, I had female press people ordering directly from me, and we started to get reports from stores that women were buying it in small sizes,” says Green. “So there was a constant conversation about whether the collection should be more gender neutral, or if I should start womenswear as a separate entity.” After a gaggle of street-style stars were snapped in Green’s duds and FKA twigs wore his kimono jacket onstage, it was clear that Green’s female fan base was on the rise. And in order to embrace them, he sent four female models down his S/S ’16 catwalk. “It was really ‘should we or shouldn’t we’ right up until the day before,” recalls Green. “But this collection was about symbolism and freedom, and it felt right to have girls in the mix.”

Green notes that the entire lineup of paneled coats, roomy trousers, and cutout sweaters is more or less unisex—and he’s offering it in a wider range of sizes, starting at XXS, to cater to his female customers. “I feel like everything is moving toward gender neutrality, and that the [line] between men’s and women’s clothing almost doesn’t exist,” says Green when asked about fashion’s increasingly blurring gender landscape (see Alessandro Michele’s Gucci, J.W. Anderson, or Hood by Air). However, don’t label him a unisex designer just yet. “I’m kind of a traditionalist, and eventually, I would like to have a men’s and a women’s line, each with its own energy and research,” Green says. In the meantime, ladies, you can continue storming the menswear racks.

Credits: Makeup Nobuko Maekawa using M.A.C Cosmetics  Hair Yumi Nakada Dingle using Oribe  Model Erin (M+P Models)  Photo assistant Nina Parsons  Stylist assistant Surgil Khan

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