Masters At Work: Guido Palau

Masters At Work: Guido Palau

For V107, we highlight the superstar makeup artists and hairstylists who have earned a spotlight of their own.

For V107, we highlight the superstar makeup artists and hairstylists who have earned a spotlight of their own.

Photography: Schohaja

Text: Priya Rao

Perhaps more than anyone, British-born stylist Guido Palau has been responsible for era-defining hair. Not only was he responsible for the looks of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Cindy Crawford and Tatjana Patitz in George Michael’s “Freedom! 90” video, he helped usher in the fashion world’s embrace of grunge when he created Kate Moss’s messy, bed-head hair in David Sims’s unforgettable black-and-white images. “George Michael was the epitome of the supermodel,” he says. “But it was also the end of one thing and the beginning of this other thing. The early-to-mid 1990s grunge period, a whole new idea of beauty was happening.”

Palau got his start in fashion after working at a Vidal Sasson salon in London in the ’80s. “It was very creative and the beginning of youth cults and street style, it felt slightly underground,” he remembers. Fittingly, Palau spent his time with a who’s who of visionaries, like Sims, photographer Corinne Day, stylist Melanie Ward, and a young Moss. Calvin Klein took notice of the up-and-coming tribe and flew them to New York for the history-making Moss-Mark Wahlberg shoot.

Today, Palau is the global creative director for Redken and continues his cutting-edge style, from the minimalist, slicked-back ponytails at Prada Spring 2017 (seen above) to the controversial, hyper-colored Rastafarian-esque up-dos at Marc Jacobs for the same season. “Individualism is big in beauty, and I think that’s sort of happened in the last couple of years more and more—celebrating lots of different kinds of women,” he says. “In any show you’ll see someone like a Gigi to a Kendall to a tom-boyish girl with short hair or girls celebrating their natural texture with lots of curls.” As for what keeps Palau continually inspired, he acknowledges the “mystique.” As he elegantly states, “We shouldn’t ever miss an opportunity for the dream or the fantasy in beauty.”

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