Masters At Work: Lisa Eldridge

Masters At Work: Lisa Eldridge

For V107, we highlight the superstar makeup artists and hairstylists who have earned a spotlight of their own.

For V107, we highlight the superstar makeup artists and hairstylists who have earned a spotlight of their own.

Photography: Schohaja

Text: Priya Rao

Eight years before YouTube beauty tutorials became an industry mainstay, Lancôme makeup creative director Lisa Eldridge tackled the then unknown medium with a series of approachable videos that focused on conundrums like how to deal with morning-after makeup.

“I literally didn’t mention it to anyone in the fashion industry, and it took about three years for anyone to mention anything to me,” Eldridge remembers of the two-part series. She initially thought they might be harmful to her editorial career for being too simplistic— she was working with supermodels like Cindy Crawford and photographers such as Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott. It was Kate Winslet who spilled the artist’s secret to her contemporaries: “I remember being on a job with Kate—and I had never told her, or any of the celebrities I worked with—and she introduced me to one of her friends and said, ‘This is Lisa, who always does my makeup, and she does these amazing videos on YouTube and she teaches women all over the world how to cover their spots! Do you know about those?’”

As she gained more and more devoted followers, mega beauty companies began to take notice. She eventually landed at Lancôme, where she continues her tutorials and has helped develop a slew of products, including the recently launched L’Absolu Rouge lipsticks that come in a whopping 86 shades. “It was 18 months of work, and I literally felt I had given birth to these lipsticks,” she jokes. She even concocted one called “Indulge,” a pink-y, orang-y light red for her own everyday use. “It totally fulfilled my narcissistic goal of having my own lipstick just for me,” she laughs.

That kind of personalization reminds Eldridge of her first beauty product love: her mother’s box of old-school Mary Quant crayons. “They were chewed, gloopy, and even smelled different,” she says. “I loved the objects themselves because they had the power to be transformative. Makeup still has that power for me.”

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