Models.com Asked the Question: "How Should A Model Be Treated?"

Models.com Asked the Question: "How Should A Model Be Treated?"

See what many models had to say about the fashion industry's poor working conditions—and the adverse effects it has on them.

See what many models had to say about the fashion industry's poor working conditions—and the adverse effects it has on them.

Text: Ndey Buri

Models.com has recently disclosed responses taken from a site-wide survey they conducted for their users entitled, "How should a model be treated?" and saw the participation of many notable models such as Fernanda Ly.

The treatment of models in the fashion industry has been a topic of conversation with many fashion brands and designers coming under fire lately for issues of poor work conditions, diversity, discrimination, poor pay and mental health abuse. In 2016, The CFDA reinstated their "Health Initiative": a set of industry guidelines which hopes to raise awareness for healthy and fair work environment for models. Among the guidelines, brands and designers are encouraged to, "Support the well-being of younger individuals by not hiring models under the age of sixteen for runway shows" and expected to provide "regular breaks and rest"—conditions which are all too often overlooked.

Model Fernanda Ly spoke of a harrowing instance in which she was subject to sexual harassment at the hands of a male stylist saying, "I was once shooting a lookbook where the stylist, helping me dress, used this chance to feel my body up much more than necessary and continued to do so throughout the entire shoot. Countless times have I had to undress in undesirable public situations, but even now I can remember the disgusting feel of this man’s hands tracing my body. Most of us start when underaged, we develop and mature as women under all this as the norm. What has already happened has happened, but please do not let this continue to be so."

One anonymous model noted that the poor work conditions are almost customary noting, "I feel like we all are supposed to deal with the mistreatment: We have a job that millions of girls would kill for, so we should be happy with what we’re doing even if it has a dark and sadistic side to it." This way of thinking, she explains, is in fear of "the risk of losing future job opportunities". The model continued in noting how casting director James Scully's decision to name drop industry perpetrators accused of mistreating their models was, "wonderful to finally have someone with power in the industry to address these things" but that it is, ultimately, "not sustainable to have a single spokesperson."

See what many other models had to say in their full responses here.

Credits: Banner Image Photography The Street Sensei

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