Sia, Adwoa Aboah, and More Are Using Art to Protest Trans Bathroom Laws

Sia, Adwoa Aboah, and More Are Using Art to Protest Trans Bathroom Laws

President Trump may be ignoring Pride Month, but that's all the more reason to get loud.

President Trump may be ignoring Pride Month, but that's all the more reason to get loud.

Text: Emma Blanchard

It's been a difficult year for the LGBTQ+ community and its supporters. The Trump Administration has turned back the clock on pivotal advancements instituted by the Obama administration regarding trans-bathroom laws. While Trump vowed to support the LGBTQ+ community, and even at points in his political career labeled himself a supporter, it is not hard to believe that Trump did not stay loyal to his word—nor has he mentioned Pride month once. The promises made were evidently illegitimate as just last month Texas legislators advanced a bill that requires transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms which correspond to their “biological sex."

The controversial bill accomplishes nothing but further marginalizing a community that is already extremely marginalized in the United States. According to the Trevor Project, an American non-profit organization founded in 1998 focused on suicide prevention efforts among the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender communities, 40% of transgender adults reported having made a suicide attempt. 92% of these individuals reported having attempted suicide before the age of 25.  The government has essentially validated discrimination against a community already susceptible to a prejudice, disproportionate risk of suicide, bullying, and abuse.

With these disheartening changes taking place, it is more important than ever to be vocal about the injustices imposed by the Trump administration. That being said, the polarization of the political spectrum benefits no one. This is why Arts Not Parts, an organization with the goal of supporting America's gender fluid and trans youth through creative outlets, has decided to approach injustice in a peaceful, respectful, and artistic manner. The organization has reached out to 45 different influential figures and platforms from artists to activists to models with the objective of sending the government a message through imagery. Graphic posters with compelling messages about the recent shifts regarding bathroom laws have been created and endorsed by cultural influencers including Peaches, Sia, Adwoa Aboah, JD Samson, and Charlie Craggs.  The posters are all downloadable with the intention of being printed and hung on the walls of bathrooms all across the U.S. The artworks reaffirm that using the bathroom should not be daunting and uncomfortable for anyone.

The posters are available for download on Arts Not Part's website. Showcase your pride and stand in solidarity with the LGBTQ+ community by hanging one up next time you take a trip to the loo.

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