TV Guide: What We're Watching This Spring

TV Guide: What We're Watching This Spring

Spring is upon us, which means warmer weather, blooming flowers, and new TV shows that will convince you to stay in bed regardless. Here’s our picks for the must-watch shows this season, some which were made for binge-watching, and others that will keep you at the edge of your seat every week.

Spring is upon us, which means warmer weather, blooming flowers, and new TV shows that will convince you to stay in bed regardless. Here’s our picks for the must-watch shows this season, some which were made for binge-watching, and others that will keep you at the edge of your seat every week.

Text: Jake Viswanath

Feud: Bette and Joan

Ryan Murphy’s latest anthology series delivers more than ever on the camp and utterly ridiculous humor. The first installation of Feud focuses on the infamous feud between Joan Crawford and Bette Davis, brilliantly portrayed by Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon respectively, on the set of their classic comeback film What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? With an all-star cast also including Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci, and Jackie Hoffman, it’ll be hard to beat the spectacular excess of Feud.

Girlboss

The upcoming Netflix drama follows Sophie Amaruso, founder of clothing site Nastygirl, as she navigates the fashion world and begins to build her company. Up and coming actress Britt Robertson portrays Amaruso, who serves as an executive producer on the project alongside Charlize Theron. The series, based on her autobiography, promises to be an authentic and no-holds-barred portrayal of Amaruso, making for an intriguing look into what it takes to build a modern empire.

Dear White People

The upcoming Netflix comedy, as you may expect, takes aim at white privilege and ignorant words in the most effective way possible: with humor. The series sees a group of black students at an Ivy League school poke fun at the white establishment and privilege within institutions, a prospect which has already created ire from alt-right supporters. Could a show be any more timely?

Big Little Lies

Think of this all-star series as The Real Housewives of Monterey, except much more juicy, sinister, and scripted. Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, and Shailene Woodley play three mothers who serve as the lens for the small town of Monterey’s low-key community plagued with marital issues, friendship drama, and an alarming murder that has everyone suspicious of each other. Basically, it’s Desperate Housewives, but with Oscar-winning actress taking the place of Eva Longoria and Nicolette Sheridan.

13 Reasons Why

The highly anticipated Netflix show, produced by Selena Gomez and based off the best-selling novel by Jay Asher, takes a dark and powerful look at what goes on inside the mind of someone who's suicidal. Before she took her life, high-schooler Hannah Baker recorded 13 tapes, each focused on a different classmate who played a role in her choice to commit suicide. The 13-episode miniseries focuses on each tape individually, exploring the many different factors that lead people to make that tragic decision, and ensuring an utterly heartwrenching but very enlightening watch.

The Arrangement

The riveting E! drama tells the story of aspiring actress Megan Morrison, who signs a million-dollar contract and enters an arranged relationship with famous actor Kyle West at the encouragement of Kyle’s spiritual leader. It gets hairy when Megan discovers that he is also the leader of controversial organization Institute of the Higher Mind. Basically, this show isn’t influenced by the workings of Scientology at all. Nope.

Twin Peaks

The cult classic is finally making its return, and it’s bound to be more grandiose than ever thanks to the excessively amazing cast list, including Laura Dern, Jessica Szohr, Eddie Vedder, Amanda Seyfried, Sky Ferreira, and Naomi Watts. We know that the reboot will be set 25 years after the initial series finale and consist of a lengthy 18 episodes, but David Lynch hasn’t revealed much else. We’ll just have to tune in when it premieres in May to find out.

Legion

Legion may be the latest case of a superhero comic turned into a TV series, but Noah Hawley's FX masterpiece is unlike any that have come before it. The series is based on Marvel's David Haller, a young mutant whose psychic powers led to a misdiagnosis of schizophrenia as a child, and eventual institutionalization. Hawley takes a Wes Andersonian approach to the building out the psychological drama, creating a '60s-meets-2017 aesthetic that makes the audience feel as though they've been transported into an entirely unique world conjured by the lead character. All in all, it's a smart look at one of America's final taboos: the stigmas that surround psychological welfare and disorders.

Riverdale

What at first seemed like yet another comic book-inspired TV show is turning out to be one of the most fun and subtly progressive shows on television. KJ Apa brings famous comic book caricature Archie Andrews to life as he battles the coming-to-age process of high school, with the conflict of different romantic interests and embattled friendships at the forefront. At the center of the shows lies the mystery behind a tragic death which rattles the small town of Riverdale, making for a thrilling combo of suspense, love, and shameless nostalgia.

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