Stars of Sundance: Natasha Lyonne

Stars of Sundance: Natasha Lyonne

Back In January, V Caught Up With All Of The Stars Of This Year's Sundance Film Festival For Our Fashion & Film Issue. Below, Hollywood Vet And 90's Star Natasha Lyonne, Stopped By To Promote Her New Film The Intervention.

Back In January, V Caught Up With All Of The Stars Of This Year's Sundance Film Festival For Our Fashion & Film Issue. Below, Hollywood Vet And 90's Star Natasha Lyonne, Stopped By To Promote Her New Film The Intervention.

Photography: Charlie Engman

Styling: Emma Wyman

Text: Patrik Sandberg

Arriving in Park City with three films in tow, Natasha Lyonne was quite possibly the most popular lady at Sundance. “It was moving for me to have a movie with Clea [DuVall] and a movie with Chloë [Sevigny] in the same year,” Lyonne says. “They are my two best friends of twenty years. The only two times I’d been at Sundance before were once with Clea in the ’90s for But I’m A Cheerleader, and once with Chloë in 2003 for Party Monster, so it was funny to be there all at once. And we were all there in a filmmaker capacity: Chloë had directed her first short film, I had produced Antibirth, and Clea had written, directed, starred in, and produced her first movie. Not in my wildest fantasies did I imagine it would be this cool to be pushing 40—which I think we should talk about at length.”

Since her 1986 debut on Pee-wee’s Playhouse, Lyonne has amassed a long list of film credits. It was her role on Orange Is the New Black, though, that truly brought her out of a relative period of obscurity following her successes as a teen actor, a provenance that now enables her to help get films financed. “I am so grateful to [OITNB creator] Jenji Kohan,” Lyonne says. “I get to do that show, and I get to make a bunch of independent movies. I’m glad I took a break, though. I think having whatever version of your own nervous breakdown is a healthy thing. It’s a natural instinct to drop out of life for a second.”

Lyonne prides herself on gravitating to the weirder end of the movie spectrum. “[Antibirth] is a fascinating picture,” she says, in the tone of a Hollywood big-wig. “It’s like gonzo filmmaking. If Hunter S. Thompson was a 30-something actress, this would be the kind of role he’d be seeking out. [Director] Danny Perez’s brains are just explosive. It’s so far out there that Chloë and I were actually laughing in the screening, which is rare. Usually you’re so busy being uptight and nervous about your own performance, but this movie transcends that because it’s so out to lunch.”

In the horror film about a bad trip that results in a bizarre, accelerated pregnancy, Lyonne plays Lou, a military veteran and obsessive drug user who finds herself possibly in the center of a military medical conspiracy. “There is a thread of people wanting to take the piss out of things and have a sense of humor about filmmaking,” she says. This could include Kevin Smith and his Yoga Hosers, which features Lyonne as a trash-talking stepmother to Lily-Rose Depp in a teen gross-out comedy that reads as Clueless or Clerks, but high on energy drinks. “At a certain point you want to start subverting the mechanism. The presumption is that you’ve already bought the ticket, so now we’re going to take you for a ride.”

When it came to playing DuVall’s love interest in The Intervention, Lyonne says, “Any opportunity to make out with Clea is something I jump at. She also cast me against type. It’s like But I’m A Cheerleader: she’s the tough guy, and I’m the one with the blow out and pink blouses. I’m excited for her to direct her next movie, and I should only hope to be so lucky that she will ask me to play her girlfriend again.” 

This is an excerpt from V101

LYONNE WEARS COAT DIOR JEWELRY LYONNE’S OWN
Credits: Makeup Tsipporah using M.A.C. Cosmetics  Hair Emma Parkes Hair  Production Sylvia Farago LTD  Digital technician Jonathan Hokklo  Photo assistant Michael Tessler  Stylist assistant Coco Campbell  Grooming assistant Tammy Yi  Equipment ACME Camera Company

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