The V/Ford Model Search By Gia Coppola

The V/Ford Model Search By Gia Coppola

OUR ANNUAL FORD MODEL SEARCH IS BACK WITH TWO NEW CONTRACTS! SEE THE ALL-AMERICAN WINNERS ELISE AGEE AND KATE OLTHOFF IN GUCCI PRE-FALL AS THEY EMBARK ON BRAND-NEW CAREERS IN PALO ALTO DIRECTOR GIA COPPOLA’S ROBERT ALTMAN HOMAGE. READ OUR INTERVIEWS WITH THE WINNERS ELISE AND KATE, AND BE SURE TO PRE-ORDER YOUR COPY OF V101

OUR ANNUAL FORD MODEL SEARCH IS BACK WITH TWO NEW CONTRACTS! SEE THE ALL-AMERICAN WINNERS ELISE AGEE AND KATE OLTHOFF IN GUCCI PRE-FALL AS THEY EMBARK ON BRAND-NEW CAREERS IN PALO ALTO DIRECTOR GIA COPPOLA’S ROBERT ALTMAN HOMAGE. READ OUR INTERVIEWS WITH THE WINNERS ELISE AND KATE, AND BE SURE TO PRE-ORDER YOUR COPY OF V101

Photography: Gia Coppola

Styling: Arianne Phillips

Text: Derek Blasberg

Robert Altman’s 1977 film 3 Women was born in the director’s subconscious, based entirely on a dream he had about a mysteriously weird (or weirdly mysterious) relationship between Shelley Duvall and her roommate Sissy Spacek in a stark, sun- and sand-drenched Southern California town. The actresses play Pinky and Millie, coworkers at a health spa full of elderly clients. Their relationship becomes further complicated with the entrance of Willie (Janice Rule), whose husband, Edgar (Robert Fortier), becomes embroiled in a love triangle – or here, rather, a love square – with all three women.

It’s an eerie, odd film. But visually speaking, the empty yet saturated cinematic expanses are exactly the sort of fashion reference the photographer and film director Gia Coppola was looking for when she shot the winners of our annual Ford Model Search. “I was drawn to its subtlety,” Coppola says, adding that she had watched 3 Women as a young girl, but didn’t entirely understand the visual complexities until she watched it again recently. “I love the attention to detail and the slow build of the characters’ psychoses.”

Specifically, Coppola says that she and the shoot’s fashion director, Arianne Phillips, looked to the film’s hair, color scheme, and “the sparseness of the location.” They both felt it was the perfect venue to showcase Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele’s third critically acclaimed womenswear collection. “It’s incredible what he’s done. He inspires me,” Coppola says. “It’s truly art. He’s like Christian Dior in the 1950s: he’s changing how people dress and look at clothes.

“On location,” Coppola continues, “we found some similarities between the film and the fashion. Altman’s storytelling wasn’t linear and existed in a grey area between the real and unreal. The same can be said of Michele’s Gucci shows, which blur the lines between male and female, contemporary and vintage. Both of these creatures hark into our memories to make us realize how we feel in the moment.”

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