V99: The New Visual Artists

V99: The New Visual Artists

ALANNA HEISS AND KLAUS BIESENBACH CAN SPOT A BURGEONING ART STAR FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE. HERE, FOUR OF THEIR PICKS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION OF VISUAL ARTISTS DESCRIBE WHAT THE FUTURE LOOKS LIKE

ALANNA HEISS AND KLAUS BIESENBACH CAN SPOT A BURGEONING ART STAR FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE. HERE, FOUR OF THEIR PICKS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION OF VISUAL ARTISTS DESCRIBE WHAT THE FUTURE LOOKS LIKE

COOPER HOLOWESKI

“Cannibal Universe is a series of video loops I’ m working on that are about our relationship with the infinite. It’ s a spiritual manifesto addressing reincarnation and the birth/death of the cosmos, except it’ s made with materials like cardboard and aluminum foil—so while there are moments of transcendence where the viewer gets lost in the imagery, these means of construction are always present. Last summer I was awarded a residency with the Clocktower Gallery. When discussing my project with Alanna, I told her that more than a normal studio space, I needed a room with a view. There’ s a part in the piece where the camera pans back from a rock floating in space to reveal the rock sitting on a green screen in an animation booth in a room overlooking the city, so there’ s this idea of the universe depicting itself within itself. Alanna offered me an office in the Clocktower space at Jones Day in Midtown, which was exactly what I needed.”AJAY KURIAN

“I was speaking to a curator once and he was recounting a myth to me. He couldn’ t remember the details or the names, but he was fervently speaking of this astronomer whose heart was set on the stars, who had no other hopes and dreams but to focus his every waking minute on what was above, to the detriment of what he was amidst. He had forsaken his polis, his city, as he believed his purpose to be higher. The curator suddenly stopped and looked at me and said, ‘But you’ re different. You are the astronomer in the polis.’ Of course it’ s a ridiculous thing to pronounce, but it’ s still what I hope the work can do: to peer into those places beyond what we know for certain, while committed to the common realities we must certainly face. The art is in getting the viewer to follow me down that path.”AMY BRENER

“My sculptures are layered, complex, and confounding things, injected with the residue of daily studio life and labor. Multitudinous scraps and treasures are suspended between strata of polyurethane resin and foam, as though preserved for future discovery and potential use. Implied functionality is integral to the work, as emphasized by the recent inclusion of wearable items. Makeshift switchboards are encrusted into surfaces, composed of keyboard keys, beads, tiles, dried flora, and technological bric-a-brac. These minutiae invite close-range examination, while the overall forms demand distance. Light-sensitive materials provide shifting refractions and reflections as the viewer moves around the sculptures. I imagine these works as coming from a reality that is similar yet distinct from our own, where there is a different range of possibilities and new hope for things to come.”KEVIN BEASLEY

“It is within repose—an O.G. classic fold, as he walks, becomes a chamber—a reflection of sentiment, reverberating empty at 17.”

Cooper Holoweski. Still from the forthcoming Cannibal Universe. 

Cooper Holoweski

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Ajay Kurian. Cellar House Rules. 2015. Neon, dirt, chromed ostrich eggs, silver enamel, yams.

Ajay Kurian

Amy Brener

KEVIN BEASLEY. UNTITLED (... JUST WATCH). 2015. NAUTICA RAIN JACKET, RESIN.

Kevin Beasley

Amy Brener. Dressing Kit. 2015. Resin, foam, silicone, plaster, pigment, fresnel lens, PlextGlass, found objects.

Credits: PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL AVEDON

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The Roundup: February 5