What Would They Buy Now: Marlene Dietrich

What Would They Buy Now: Marlene Dietrich

IN THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF "WHAT WOULD THEY BUY NOW?" V PREDICT WHAT HOLLYWOOD'S ENIGMATIC ACTRESS AND ICON MARLENE DIETRICH WOULD SPLURGE ON TODAY

IN THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF "WHAT WOULD THEY BUY NOW?" V PREDICT WHAT HOLLYWOOD'S ENIGMATIC ACTRESS AND ICON MARLENE DIETRICH WOULD SPLURGE ON TODAY

Text: Tania Farouki

Marlene Dietrich. It's rare that two words can't help but evoke a singularity so distinct that an attempted comparison to others seems out of the question. Possessing perhaps one of the most recognizable style trademarks in the world, it was the allure, along with a hypnotic on and offscreen presence, that gave Marlene Dietrich that unmistakeable flair.

Born in Berlin, the actress began electrifying audiences while appearing in stage productions and silent films during the 1920s, before eventually switching to the talkies and landing a breakthrough role as a sensual cabaret dancer in The Blue Angel in 1930--as it turns out, she came to define the decade (along with a revived post-war career) with her full-on glamour look. Dietrich went on to star in a slew of dazzling visual productions, such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932) and The Garden of Allah (1936).

She once famously said, "I dress for the image. Not for myself, not for the public, not for fashion, not for men." Looking at movie stills and publicity shots, it's easy to see why taking on that philosophy was a genius career move: channelling now infamous bedroom eyes with delicately drawn thin eyebrows while almost always holding a cigarette, Dietrich looked just as striking in a full tuxedo and beret as she would in imposing opulent furs, jewels and draped dresses.

It's no wonder she still inspires to this day--who could forget John Galliano's rendition of the screen siren for Christian Dior, with his Spring-Summer 2008 ready-to-wear collection, and the brilliantly punned 'D'Trick' handbag? And V's very own tribute with a most glorious transformation performed on Kirsten Dunst for V64?

One of the foremothers of androgyny, Dietrich would naturally 'slay' it in today's times. Taking full advantage of the fact that men's clothes give a most original twist, she'd turn to tailoring greats Versace and Givenchy for evening pants and tuxedo jackets--her go-to ensemble. A champion of the ruffled white shirt and mink coats (Fendi would be her staple), she would most certainly join in on the gender fluidity debate too, and even add some kink into her accessories. But once she'd be in the mood for full-fledged glamour, it's safe to say Dietrich would look good in anything--even a candy striped crepe gown courtesy of Goth prodigy Gareth Pugh. In other words, all or nothing.

Click through our slideshow to see what Marlene would buy now.

The Coat: Fendi striped mink fur coat

Marlene Dietrich photographed by Ernst Lubitsch, 1937 

The Magazine: V64 featuring Kirsten Dunst photographed by Mario Testino

The Home Item: Herm¨s "Les Chemins Secrets" change tray in bronze and printed porcelain with velvet goatskin base

The Dress: Gareth Pugh one-shoulder striped crepe gown

The Body Accessory: Fraulein Kink patent leather noir tuxedo harness

The Beauty Item: Giorgio Armani "High Precision" brow pencil

The Hat: Maison Michel "Virginie" rabbit-felt fedora

The Trousers: Versace cady and pliss silk-chiffon wide-leg pants

The Ring: Noor Fares "Nellum" 18-karat gray gold, diamond and mother-of-pearl ring

The Boot: Loewe suede "Column Ring" knee boots

The Jacket: Givenchy tuxedo jacket in satin-trimmed stretch-cady 

The Album: Sia, This Is Acting (2016, RCA Records)

The Shirt: Alexander McQueen ruffled silk-georgette blouse

UP NEXT

M.I.A. Wants You To Rewear It With H&M