Baby Jane Holzer, The Girl Who Reigned 1964

Baby Jane Holzer, The Girl Who Reigned 1964

V embarks on a nostalgic journey to look back at Warhol Superstar, Baby Jane Holzer.

V embarks on a nostalgic journey to look back at Warhol Superstar, Baby Jane Holzer.

Text: Christina Cacouris

If Holly Golightly had been mod, she would be Jane Holzer, the leonine Warhol muse who would hang backstage with the Rolling Stones in a zebra jacket and her sultry cat eyes peeking out under a corona of hair. Called “the most contemporary girl I know” by legendary editor of Vogue Diana Vreeland, Jane (“Baby Jane”) Holzer was not only a Warhol superstar but also dubbed “The Girl of the Year” in 1964 by Tom Wolf when she was just 24 years old. Somewhere in the intersection between pop-art and camp, Baby Jane flitted in and out of Vogue, Life magazine and Studio 54 all while wearing towering platforms and a ton of glitter with her hair in a bouffant, calling anything and anyone “super-marvelous” or “divine.”

Credited as one of Warhol’s girls, Baby Jane was actually discovered by legendary British photographer David Bailey one year prior in 1963 after dropping out of the now-defunct Finch College and leaving the Manhattan school for London and a summer of modeling. “Bailey is fantastic,” she told Tom Wolfe in the legendary feature. “Bailey created four girls that summer. He created Jean Shrimpton, he created me, he created Angela Howard and Susan Murray. There’s no photographer like that in America. Avedon hasn’t done that for a girl, Penn hasn’t, and Bailey created four girls in one summer. He did some pictures of me for the English Vogue, and that was all it took.” She soon got introduced to Warhol, becoming a close friend and muse, appearing in his underground films and screen tests—one of which featured the model-cum-actress brushing her teeth, wide-eyed for three minutes straight.

Following the halcyon days of the 60s, Jane Holzer has remained something of an enigma, withdrawing from the scene after Warhol's attempted assassination, and disappearing almost as quickly as she arrived.

Credits: COVER IMAGE Baby Jane Holzer, Andy Warhol Screen Test, 1964 © The Warhol Foundation

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