Generation V: Vol. III

Generation V: Vol. III

A rap-game Malibu barbie, an indie bandleader, and a model-turned-alt diva break through.

A rap-game Malibu barbie, an indie bandleader, and a model-turned-alt diva break through.

Photography: Ungano + Agriodimas

Styling: Taylor Angino

Text: Julia Gray

"Women in music” is a somewhat tired talking point, despite remerging as a hot topic in 2017 with head- lines like “Women Are Making the Best Rock Music Today.” These statements, while well-meaning, were reductive, if not déjà vu–inducing; it had been exactly 10 years since Madonna, Tina Turner, and Courtney Love were on the cover of Rolling Stone’s “Women of Rock” ’97 issue. It’s now 2019 and female musicians are not novelties. True equality can be found in simply celebrating the scope of their talent, no think-piece necessary. But these three, Maliibu Miitch, Gabbriette and Julia Cumming, are worth more than a sound-bite.


Maliibu Miitch

An east-coast MC rides her wave.

Like the double-I’s in Maliibu Miitch, there are two “I”s in the Bronx-bred rapper: “‘Maliibu’ is my bubbly, fun side. ‘Miitch’ is the South Bronx in me,” she explains. “I like to play on both in my music.” Both sides reveal themselves in bouncy hooks and no-nonsense verses, Nicki Minaj–esque giggles and grunts à la Biggie. Maliibu’s distinct flow can be traced back to other New York-bred rappers like Minaj, 50 Cent, and Foxy Brown. Her forthcoming album, If Dead Men Could Talk, even draws its name from an early 50 Cent mixtape. “In New York, you have to be rough and tough and roll with the punches,” says Maliibu. “[The city] made my music what it is. I can be very blunt and unfiltered. That’s what New York is.”


Julia Cumming

The rocker sprite reclaims "dude."

In her band Sunflower Bean, the ethereally voiced Julia Cumming summons the weight of the classic rock she grew up on. “I don’t like music that can blow away in the wind—stuff that was made for radio and [grabs] people’s attention because it [mentions] Tinder,” she says. “I’d rather be making new and stranger artwork.” Sunflower Bean embodies this mentality on their recent EP, King of the Dudes, along with the political undertones of Cumming’s activism. In 2017, she founded Anger Can Be Power, a project that aims to invoke political involvement with a “DIY spirit.” “You have to fight. If you stop fighting, you start losing,” she says. Her stirring musical energy is just as catalyzing.


Gabbriette

The model-gone-"Nasty" debuts.

Despite concentrating in music, Gabbriette cites Nicole Kidman as one of her greatest influences. But as lead singer for buzzy girl group Nasty Cherry, which earned a spot on Charli XCX’s Vroom Vroom label without any official releases, Gabriette is nothing if not chameleonic. Asked what she wants listeners to get from her music, Gabbriette echoes XCX’s brand of high-octane pop: “A nice drive and some good sex,” says the former ballerina. With her guest spot on XCX’s forthcoming album still gestating, this black swan is already in the fast lane.

LEFT TO RIGHT: MALIIBU WEARS DRESS CHLOE SHOES GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI JEWELRY HER OWN, JULIA WEARS DRESS COACH BRACELET CARTIER RINGS TIFFANY & CO. BELT STYLIST’S OWN SHOES HER OWN, GABBRIETTE WEARS DRESS REDEMPTION SHOES GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI RINGS TIFFANY & CO.

Credits:
Makeup Mark Edio (See Management) Hair Charles McNair (See Management) Photo assistants Tim Doyan, Angel Morales Location Pier 59

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