Get Lit: Lizzy Goodman, Meet Me In The Bathroom

Get Lit: Lizzy Goodman, Meet Me In The Bathroom

Author Lizzy Goodman sits down with V to tell us about the books that inspired "Meet Me In The Bathroom," her seminal New York music history book.

Author Lizzy Goodman sits down with V to tell us about the books that inspired "Meet Me In The Bathroom," her seminal New York music history book.

Text: Christina Cacouris

In Get Lit we sit down with authors and creatives to hear about their favorite books du jour. This week we talk to Lizzy Goodman, author of the 2000’s music oral history book Meet Me In The Bathroom  (as the title suggests, it focuses heavily on The Strokes) to hear about what she’s reading lately and what’s inspired her. Read on to get her three top picks:

The Girls by Emma Cline

“I’m a little late to the party on this one, I know, but I just finally read it and … Oh. My. God. The thing I’m searching for with all art, really, is a circumventing of my rational mind in favor of a mainline to my heart and soul. I want to be made to feel, not think. Using language as her tool, Cline manages to transport you into the feeling of being female, while telling a totally gripping, heartrending story. Amazing.”

Please Kill Me by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

“The rock and roll bible, as far as I’m concerned. I read this when I first got to New York, at the beginning of the era now documented in Meet Me in the Bathroom and it set the standard for what I imagined sex, drugs, and rock and roll in New York City could be. If Meet Me comes anywhere near documenting for my era what Please Kill Me has for its, then I can die a happy human.”

Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

“The lit-girl bible. It’s probably right to say that rock and roll and Joan Didion have had equal influence on me, and form the kind of borders of my creative life. I’ve been drawn to music and music culture because I want to escape my own mind, but, with the exception of a few blissful moments during a White Stripes or Yeah Yeah Yeahs gig, that’s never really going to happen. I’m always observing, always taking notes, and have been since I can remember. I was assigned this in 9th grade English (thanks Mr. Musgrave) and it gave me peace even then, knowing that my own nerdiness, my own obsession with ceaseless analysis, could, as it is for Didion, be a pathway to freedom through self-expression."

Credits: IMAGE BY Katia Temkin COURTESY OF HARPER COLLINS

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