Premiere: Little Boots Dances the Pain Away on “Shadows”

Premiere: Little Boots Dances the Pain Away on “Shadows”

We talk to the everlasting electronic musician about her new single, moving to America, and why emotional dance floor bangers are the best kind.

We talk to the everlasting electronic musician about her new single, moving to America, and why emotional dance floor bangers are the best kind.

Text: Jake Viswanath

“I love crying-on-the-dancefloor songs. They’re my favorite kind of pop songs,” Victoria Hesketh, better known as electronic pop musician Little Boots, proudly states soon after we hop on the phone. And I must concur. There aren’t many artists that can perfectly capture the euphoric joys and disasters  Robyn has more than mastered the art, most notably with “Dancing On My Own,” while Kylie Minogue has been known to whip out tear-inducing pop perfection on the regular throughout her career. Truthfully, Little Boots may be joining those prestigious ranks, something that she sets out to do intentionally on her new single “Shadows”, premiering exclusively on V.

“Shadows,” produced by Brazilian DJ Joyce Muniz and the first release off her upcoming EP, comes with shimmering synths and an undeniable beat made for runway struts, but drips in self-doubt and the ruins of broken love — or as she says, it’s made for “dancing in the darkest parts of the club.” The entire project was conceptualized after some major life changes for the singer, one of which being the end of a long romance.

"I was in a relationship for a long time, and I really just thought that was it," she explains. "And even though there was a lot of pain when it ended, [which] found its way onto this EP, it’s also awe-inspiring that you can go through that much emotion. You really face your own emotions and how powerful they can be, and it’s really inspiring. And then having to rediscover desire and attachment and all of these things... I just found I had so much more to write about, and I'm still in the middle of that and exploring it. It’s fascinating and terrible and wonderful and awe-inspiring and lonely and ecstatic and all of these crazy things."

Fueled by a fresh start, and a potential vendetta against men (understandable), the artist ended up creating this project with only women and non-binary people handling every aspect. "Producers, mixers, even video director, art, graphic design, everyone’s been women. It wasn’t actually going to be so female focused, but then once we started, it was like, ‘Wow! There’s all these amazing women out here! Let’s make everyone involved women,' and we did it." But perhaps the most important aspect in her creative process was her transplant from her native England to the sunny shores of LA. "I have a little studio where right now I’m sat and looking over clear sky and palm trees," she remarks. "Just what that does for your brain, it’s a massively different thing from looking at a brick wall or an old Victorian rundown warehouse or something."

She seems to be taking the LA work ethic and music industry to heart going forward, using streaming to her advantage as an independent artist and creating content to dish out to fans consistently. But that means a follow-up to her pristine electro-pop albums isn't in the works right now. "The part of me that’s nostalgic about great albums wants to make another album, but I do have to be really honest, it doesn’t feel modern." But the music will keep on coming—she's even already thinking of creating a sequel EP later this year. "I’m writing from a very genuine place right now. It feels good, so I want to continue that and just keep being brutally honest," she said. "And surely, the best revenge on an ex is to write a song about it." It's a winning formula for certain others, after all.

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