Saint Laurent Unveils a New Exhibit at the Contemporary Rive Droit Boutique

Saint Laurent Unveils a New Exhibit at the Contemporary Rive Droit Boutique

"Dark Shadows" features art and photography curated by Anthony Vaccarello.

"Dark Shadows" features art and photography curated by Anthony Vaccarello.

Text: Dylan Kelly

As art enthusiasts flock to Paris for the annual International Contemporary Art Fair this weekend, Saint Laurent Rive Droite compiled a collection of exclusive photographs, artworks, and sculptures for a special, limited exhibition “Dark Shadows”, curated by creative director Anthony Vaccarello himself. On display will be a captivating set of Robert Mapplethorpe’s polaroids: Untitled (S&M Gear) 1972, Untitled (Tony London), 1973, Untitled (Helen Marden’s Bats), 1974, alongside Ed Ruscha’s vivid Omaha to New York, 2000 painting. Additionally, visitors will see striking sculptures signed by Lucio Fontana Concetto Spaziale Natura and an all-black Vampire 118 by Sterling Ruby. 

Elevating their brand through artistic exhibitions and customer experiences, Saint Laurent is known for forging new paths among luxury couteliers. In 1966, the French fashion house opened the Rive Gauche boutique, which was the first ready-to-wear store to exist under a luxury brand’s own name. Taking inspiration from the high fashion label’s pioneering history, Vaccarello opened the Rive Droite boutique, a contemporary space offering state-of-the-art exhibitions across fashion and art. 

“I don’t want it to be a museum,” Vaccarello claimed in a statement. “We already have younger customers, and the idea is to make products that are attractive for them. Saint Laurent was a very youthful brand in the 1960s and 1970s. It shouldn’t become something sacred and untouchable.”

A one-of-a-kind Saint Laurent store experience, the Rive Droit is intended for inspired interaction and collaborative appreciation. Take a look at the imagery from the exhibition below. 

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