Storm Reid Is a Force to Be Reckoned With

Storm Reid Is a Force to Be Reckoned With

The star of 'A Wrinkle in Time' opens up about the importance of representation in film and working with strong women like Oprah.

The star of 'A Wrinkle in Time' opens up about the importance of representation in film and working with strong women like Oprah.

Photography: Robin Harper

Styling: Sara Alviti

Text: Jake Viswanath

“I feel like representation is everything,” says Storm Reid. “And if you’re not represented, then sometimes you might not feel hopeful and don’t feel like you can do something that other people are doing when you’re just as worthy as they are.” At only 14 years old, the rising actress is already living proof that everyone is worthy of a chance at whatever they may want to achieve.

The bright star is about to steal hearts nationwide, playing lead character Meg Murry in director Ava DuVernay’s upcoming remake of A Wrinkle in Time, based off the 1962 novel by Madeline L’Engle. The role wasn’t necessarily written for an African-American girl, a fact that Reid knows all too well, but embraces with the maturity of a seasoned actress knowing the impact they can create. “To to be able to do that for other little African-American kids is amazing because I know what that kid needs and what that kid wants — to see themselves and have somebody that really inspires them and looks like them to be able to live out their dreams.”

In the film, Meg spearheads a mission to save her scientist father from a distant planet, showing audiences that anyone can be a leader, especially young Black girls. By taking this part and transforming it into her own, Reid herself does just the same. “If you want to be an actress or an astronaut or a doctor or anything in between, I just want to let kids know — and especially kids that look like me know — that you can do it,” she says. “Even though you’re not seen, you can make yourself seen.”

Her sense of leadership and poise comes natural, possessing a sense of wisdom usually gained by people beyond her years, and it's easy to see why. The power of her strong female co-stars Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, and director DuVernay could rub off on anyone. "They don’t act like they’re better than anybody,” she says of working with those women. “They just love what they’re doing, and you can really tell that. They’re so grounded and down to earth. Ms. Oprah actually told me, ‘Don’t waste energy on things you can’t change in life when you can be using that energy on something positive in your life like making your dreams come true.’ So I just try to remember that all the time, and that’s kind of become my mantra now.”

But at the end of the day, she’s still a 14-year-old young girl trying to navigate adolescence and figure out the future ahead, the quality in herself that she sees most within Meg. “I feel like a lot of teenagers will be able to relate to her because she’s just trying to grow up and trying to do the right things,” she explains. “But unfortunately, she does have challenges and faults that get in the way of her growing up, that are putting blocks and barriers in front of her.” And at the end of the day, her goal with this role is to relate to others and let those similarities unite each other. She directly compares the darkness of the movie with the heated climate in society today, and wisely, sees the film as both an escapist relief and a positive encouragement of unity.

“I feel like if the audience sees us coming together in our movie and saving the world from the darkness, you can do the same in our world right now,” she says. “We just have to get over the fact that, yes, people are not going to be the same. They’re not going to look the same, they’re not going to have the same opinions because we’re all unique. We can’t be like any other person. So if we just get over that hump in the road and forget about minor details that don’t really even matter, whether it’s sexuality or religion or gender or age, we can come together.”

TURBAN AND DRESS JULIA CLANCY, BRACELET BULGARI, RING BULGARI AND BARRY BRINKER AT ROSEARK LOS ANGELES
Credits: HAIR PRESTON WADA (OPUS) MAKEUP MELISSA MURDICK (OPUS) HEADER IMAGE: Turban and Dress Julia Clancy

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