Teen Vogue Print to Fold, Other Publications Scaled Back

Teen Vogue Print to Fold, Other Publications Scaled Back

Condé Nast, pinnacle of publishing, has chosen to stop publication of Teen Vogue print as consumers continuously choose digital platforms.

Condé Nast, pinnacle of publishing, has chosen to stop publication of Teen Vogue print as consumers continuously choose digital platforms.

Text: Cassidy Morrison

Times are changing, and that could not be more apparent in the world of publishing. Consumers are veering more and more toward digital outlets each year, forcing publishers to decrease the frequency of print issues and Condé Nast is no exception. The storied publishing company has announced it will fold Teen Vogue print and reduce publishing frequency of GQ, Glamour, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, W and Condé Nast Traveler.

Teen Vogue’s digital platform is markedly more profitable than its print was, and sources at Condé Nast say the company will continue pouring resources into it. Teen Vogue's average monthly unique visitors for the year were 8.27 million, according to ComScore, up from 1.4 million when Phillip Picardi, digital editorial director, took over the site in April 2015.

Although Condé Nast still makes most of its revenue from print issues, namely Vanity Fair, Vogue and The New Yorker, it is telling that many of their publications are being pulled back as print no longer resonates as loudly with consumers. Business of Fashion reported that, “According to data presented in early October by Michael J. Wolf, founder and chief executive of technology and strategy consulting firm Activate, the average American spends only 4 percent of their media consumption hours with print, compared to 20 percent on personal computers and 28 percent on mobile.”

Condé Nast has gone a step further, launching a digital-only title called Them, a mission-driven, LGBTQ-focused publication, also launched by Picardi. While it is bittersweet to say goodbye to many print publications, including Teen Vogue, it is a symptom we must accept of changing times and facets of consumerism. As Condé Nast continues in its effort to reimagine itself as a digital platform, it only makes sense to assume that a myriad publishers will follow suit in due time.

Credits: IMAGE COURTESY OF TEEN VOGUE

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