The Historical Moments from Last Night's Golden Globes

The Historical Moments from Last Night's Golden Globes

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The Historical Moments from Last Night's Golden Globes

Who's starting the campaign fund for Oprah?

Who's starting the campaign fund for Oprah?

Text: Jake Viswanath

Award shows are often the perfect platform to send a powerful message, leading to several memorable speeches from actors, activists, and artists alike that keep us thinking (and maybe crying) the next day. But last night at the 75th Annual Golden Globes, in the wake of the #MeToo movement and the new #TimesUp initiative that will support women in fighting sexual harassment and discrimination in their fields, making a statement wasn’t just an empowering bonus—it was a near-requirement, and an important one at that. And no one embodied this more than Oprah Winfrey, whose win secured her just one of the historical moments that occurred at the show last night.

The legendary Oprah became the first Black woman to receive the Cecil B. de Mille Award last night, and acknowledged that platform during her speech by recounting the moment where she watched legendary actor Sidney Poitier win the award in 1982. "In 1982 Sidney received the Cecil B. Demille Award right here at the Golden Globes, and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award."

In addition to Oprah's win, some actors gained historical accolades with their victories. Aziz Ansari became the first Asian actor to win the award for Best Actor in a Comedy Series, taking home the win for his performance in Master of None much to his genuine surprise. “I genuinely didn’t think I would win because all the websites said I was going to lose,” Ansari remarked in his speech, making the victory just that much more heartwarming. And after two previous nominations for the same role, Sterling K. Brown became the first Black actor to receive the Best Actor in a Drama Series award, winning for his role in the highly acclaimed show This Is Us.  “You wrote a role for a black man that could only be played by a black man, and what I appreciate so much about this thing is I’m being seen for who I am and being appreciated for who I am,” Brown said to show creator Dan Fogelman during the speech. “And it makes it much more difficult to dismiss me or anyone who looks like me.”

But despite the historic wins and the empowerment of women throughout the night, people (especially Natalie Portman) were quick to point out the lack of female nominees in the Best Director category, an egregious oversight considering the wealth of women who directed standout films this year, including Greta Gerwig for Lady Bird and Patty Jenkins for Wonder Woman. But what these wins show is that progress is, slowly but surely, being made.

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